A „Meet and Greet” gathering took place on September 16, 2015 at the Pilsudski Institute, introducing the Institute to the authorities and communities of Brooklyn, and to the American social and educational community. We were honored by the presence of distinguished guests: Deputy Borough President for Brooklyn Diane Reyna, State Representative for Brooklyn Assemblyman Joseph Lentol, Commander of the American Legion Richard Kenny of St Stanislaus Memorial Post # 1771, and Mary Odomirok, representative from the office of Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney. Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams issued a special proclamation, officially welcoming  the Institute to the Borough of Brooklyn and congratulating us on our recent activities.

Citation1200

Also present at the meeting were Alicja Winnicki, Superintendent  district 14, principals from Greenpoint schools PS 34 and PS 110, representatives of local Polish communities, businessmen from Brooklyn and Manhattan, a good friend of the Institute, the Polish Consul General in New York Urszula Gacek, and representatives from the media:  Nowy Dziennik, Radio Rampa, and Greenpoint Gazette.

Guests admired the gallery with Polish paintings, museum materials and historical exhibits. In their speeches they emphasized the uniqueness of the Institute and expressed gratitude that the new headquarters are now located in Greenpoint.

 Consul General of the Republic of Poland in New York Urszula Gacek, Executive Director of the Institute Iwona Korga, Assemblyman Joseph Lentol, President of the Institute Magda Kapuścinska, Superintendent of District 14 Alicja Winnicki.

Consul General of the Republic of Poland in New York Urszula Gacek, Executive Director of the Institute Iwona Korga, Assemblyman Joseph Lentol, President of the Institute Magda Kapuścinska, Superintendent of District 14 Alicja Winnicki.

Consul General of the Republic of Poland in New York Urszula Gacek, Institute volunteer Andrzej Józef Dąbrowski, Vice President of the Institute Marek Zieliński, President of the Institute Magda Kapuścinska, Executive Director of the Institute Iwona Korga, Deputy Borough President for Brooklyn Diana Reyna.Consul General of the Republic of Poland in New York Urszula Gacek, Institute volunteer Andrzej Józef Dąbrowski, Vice president of the Institute Marek Zieliński, President of the Institute Magda Kapuścinska,  Executive Director of the Institute Iwona Korga, Deputy Borough President for Brooklyn Diana Reyna.

Prague astronomical clock
Prague astronomical clock By Steve Collis from Melbourne, Australia (Astronomical Clock Uploaded by russavia) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

In one of my previous blog posts on “How to write dates?” I discussed the basic universal date and time notation, as specified in the International Organization for Standardization standard (ISO 8601) and its Word Wide Web Consortium (W3C) simplification. Since that time the Library of Congress has completed the work on the extension of this standard, the Extended Date/Time Format (EDTF) 1.0. This extension for the most part deals with expressing uncertain dates and times. Such limited or imprecise date/time information is common occurrence in recording historical events in archives libraries etc. The ISO 8601 does not allow for the expression of such concepts as “approximately  year 1962” or “some year between 1920 and 1935” or “the event occurred probably in may 1938, but we are not certain”. The EDTF standard, allows us to express them in a formalized way,, fulfilling a real need in many fields dealing with historical metadata.

Despite the fact that the standard is relatively new, and there are few software tools to help enter or validate the uncertain dates and time data, I believe, that it is worth familiarizing oneself with the new notation wherever possible.

Definitions

I would like to to begin with some definitions to facilitate the discussion of the new notation. The definitions are accompanied by symbols that will be used in the next section. 

Precision

Precision is a measure of a range or interval within which the ‘true’ value exists [1]. Precision is explicit in the date or date/time expression; if an event occurred in the year 1318, the precision is one year (it could occur at any time within this year). If we specify 1945-09-15, the precision is one day, etc. [2] In EDTF we can extend this definition to a specify a decade or century precision using the x symbol - see discussion of masked precision below.

Approximate (~)

An estimate that is assumed to be possibly correct, or close to correct, where “closeness” may be dependent on specific application.

Uncertain (?)

We are not sure of the value of the variable (in our case date or time). Uncertainty is independent of precision. The source of the information may itself not be reliable, or we may face several values and not enough information to discern between them. For example we may be uncertain as to the year, or month, or day of an event etc.

Unspecified (u)

The value is not stated. The point in time may be unspecified because it did not occur yet, because it is classified, unknown or for any other reason.

W związku z przeprowadzką do nowej siedziby Instytut organizuje wyprzedaż używanych mebli, książek i artykułów gospodarstwa domowego. Do nabycia: szafy, komody, łóżka, materace, biurka, sztućce, półki, stoły, pralka z suszarką, pościel oraz inne artykuły. Do oddania metalowe szafy na dokumenty.

Wyprzedaż odbędzie się sie w dawnej siedzibie Instytutu na 180 Second Avenue:

  • w piątek 24 kwietnia od godz 9:00 do 20:00
  • w sobotę 25 kwietnia od godz 10:00 do 17:00

Większe obiekty do obejrzenia na naszej stronie. Transport we własnym zakresie.

Bardzo okazyjne ceny!

Zapraszamy!

Tel: 212-505-9052 oraz 845-520-1092

Part II: Product

(Guest blog by Rob Hudson)

Arthur Rubinstein (Linked Data)In Part I of this blog, I began telling you about my experience transforming Carnegie Hall’s historical performance history data into Linked Open Data, and in addition to giving some background on my project and the data I’m working with, I talked about process: modeling the data; how I went about choosing (and ultimately deciding to mint my own) URIs; finding vocabularies, or predicates, to describe the relationships in the data; and I gave some examples of the links I created to external datasets.

In this installment, I’d like to talk about product: the solutions I examined for serving up my newly-created RDF data, and some useful new tools that help bring the exploration of the web of linked data down out of the realm of developers and into the hands of ordinary users. I think it’s noteworthy that none of the tools I’m going to tell you about existed when I embarked upon my project a little more than two years ago!

As I’ve mentioned, my project is still a prototype, intended to be a proof-of-concept that I could use to convince Carnegie Hall that it would be worth the time to develop and publish its performance history data as Linked Open Data (LOD) — at this point, it exists only on my laptop. I needed to find some way to manage and serve up my RDF files, enough to provide some demonstrations of the possibilities that having our data expressed this way could afford the institution. I began to realize that without access to my own server this would be difficult. Luckily for me, 2014 saw the first full release of a linked data platform called Apache Marmotta by the Apache Software Foundation. Marmotta is a fully-functioning read-write linked data server, which would allow me to import all of my RDF triples, with a SPARQL module for querying the data. Best of all, for me, was the fact that Marmotta could function as a local, stand-alone installation on my laptop — no web server needed; I could act as my own, non-public web server. Marmotta is out-of-the-box, ready-to-go, and easy to install — I had it up and running in a few hours.

PARTNERZY
mkidn
bn
senat
ndap
msz
dn
psfcu
nyc